What is the greatest gift that a parent can give to their children?

Answer by Barbie Giri:

This might not be the greatest gift a parent can give, because parents can give much more than a book. But I can just imagine how amazed anyone would be if their parents could plan and manage a secret for so many years.



I will now ask my parents to plan one too.
Better late than never.


Source
She Thought She Was Getting A Cheesy Graduation Gift… And Then She Opened The Book
What is the greatest gift that a parent can give to their children?

Which is the most beautiful state in India?

Answer by Jubanashwa Mishra:

First I thought it’s Kerala, when I spent a night in Alleppey boat house
But soon it changed to Tamilnadu, when I saw the greenish water of Rameswaram
Then Karnataka, when I saw the beautiful Mysore palace
Then Andhra Pradesh, when I look at the Tirupati temple
Telangana, When I did boating inside the Hussain Sagar Lake, Hyderabad
Then Odisha, when I had Mahaprasad at Puri Jagannath temple
Then Jharkhand, @ Hundru Fall
Then a bigger fall at Chitrakote, Chattisgarh
My quest for waterfall ends at Dhuandhar, Madhya Pradesh
West Bengal became my favorite when I enjoyed Durga Puja of Kolkata
Gradually I entered into the north east, fell in love with Sikkim
This is what I was looking for @ Tawang Monastery, Arunachal Pradesh
Fell in love with Nagaland once knowing about Horn Bill Festival
Then Manipur, once I learnt about world war II cemetery, Imphal
Then Mizoram when I saw the beautiful churches
Then Tripura when I travelled in a meter gauge train
Meghalaya, when I came across the village Mawlynnong
I enjoyed the fish through out Assam, Thanks to Brahmaputra river
Fell in love with peace when I reached Bodhgaya, Bihar
Uttar Pradesh became my favorite, After seeing Ganga Aarti in Varanasi
Soon it changed to Goa, Once I came across the the beautiful beaches
Then Maharashtra once reached the maximum city, Mumbai
Then Gujarat once looking at the mesmerizing Rann of Kutch
Rajasthan became my favorite when I looked at the beautiful palaces
Haryana I got to know the root of Mahabharata at Kurukshetra
Punjab when I saw glittering sarovar of Golden temple, Amritsar
Uttarakhand when I passed by the serpentine trail of Mussorrie
Himachal, When I reached top of the Triund Hill
Finally when I crossed miles to reach Leh Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir: I already realized that the whole India is beautiful, not just any single state.
Which is the most beautiful state in India?

What are some of the best company campuses in India?

. By

Answer by Manoj Memana Jayakumar:

Infosys - Mysore Campus

The Infosys campus in Mysore is the world’s largest corporate university,
built in 343 acres.

The main building has been inspired by Greek architecture.




Cricket Pitch: It has been said that Chennai Super Kings will be practising here from now on.


GYM

Badminton Courts


Race Track:

Bowling Alley:

Table Tennis Courts:



Swimming Pool: There are 4 swimming pools in the campus.


Training Centres:




Rooms for trainees.


Inside the 4 screen multiplex at the campus
Outside view of the multiplex.


Aerial View of the campus



Wait, Zoom in a little.


That’s right. What you read as Infosys here are actually buildings !!

I strongly doubt if there is a better campus in India.
What are some of the best company campuses in India?

What are the differences in India between 90s kids and today’s kids?

Answer by Suresh Shaha:

Back then We use to laugh - HAHAHAHAhahahaha….


And now it’s just LOL. period.

Edit:- Thank you all for your appreciation for my lil observation up there.
And I have no problem with new hypocritical  trend of LOLing. But What if one day we all forget laughing? cause One of the most beautiful things in the world I’ve ever seen or heard is people laughing, even when there seems to be so little reason for them to laugh.
So just saying ” Everybody’s Life is better when you are laughing, So Keep Laughing”
What are the differences in India between 90s kids and today’s kids?

What are some things that make Indians happy?

^_^

Answer by Aakash Neeraj Mittal:

50 people tilted a bus to rescue two students in Pune.



This happened on 29th of August. When people saw two students under the bus, they came together and lifted the bus to free them. They both are out of danger now.

Well last month, I saw a video that showed commuters in Perth, coming together and slanting a carriage to free a man who was trapped between the train and the platform. At that time, I wondered how people of India would react in this situation. 

Today I got my answer.
What are some things that make Indians happy?

What can I learn right now in just 10 minutes that could be useful for the rest of my life?

Answer by Karun Kamal:

My dear fellow quorans, after reading this you sure are going to be saved from a lot of __________ (fill yourself after reading)

Socrates’ Triple Filter:

In ancient Greece, one day a person met the great philosopher Socrates and said, “Do you know what I just heard about your friend?”

"Hold on a minute", Socrates replied.

"Before telling me anything I’d like you to pass a little test. It’s called the Triple Filter Test."

"Triple filter?"

"That’s right", Socrates continued.
"Before you talk to me about my friend, it might be a good idea to take a moment and filter what you’re going to say.
That’s why I call it the triple filter test.
The first filter is Truth.

Have you made absolutely sure that what you are about to tell me is true?”

"No," the man said, "actually I just heard about it and…"

"All right", said Socrates.
"So you don’t know if it’s true or not.

Now let’s try the second filter, the filter of Goodness.
Is what you are about to tell me about my friend something good?”

"No, on the contrary…"

"So" Socrates continued, "you want to tell me something bad about him, but you’re not certain it’s true.

You may still pass the test though, because there’s one filter left, the filter of Usefulness.

Is what you want to tell me about my friend going to be useful to me?”

"No, not really."

"Well," concluded Socrates, "if what you want to tell me is neither true nor good nor even useful, why tell it to me at all?

Edit: Source: http://shortstories.co.in/socrates-triple-filter-test/ :)
What can I learn right now in just 10 minutes that could be useful for the rest of my life?

What is the funniest thing you have ever coded?

Answer by Kiran Karanth:
I made a script that eventually led to Flipkart (an e-commerce website) delivering the product I ordered within 30 working hours after the script was run.

The scenario: I ordered the Moto G (2nd gen) phone a few seconds after it was made available on Flipkart. As usual Flipkart promised to deliver my order within 3 working days. The product had not been delivered even after 2 weeks after the previously mentioned deadline. During these two weeks I called customer care around  10-15 times, sent around 25-30 emails, posted on their facebook page and was even ready to complain in person by visiting their Bangalore office. But the status of my order was the same, my product hadn’t even reached the courier guys as clearly seen on the status tracker. Clearly the product was lost in transit, but flipkart refused to accept that and “Sorry for the inconvenience, we’ll get in touch with our courier parteners”, was the only reply I usually got.

The idea: After a few calls and e-mails Flipkart was not responsive at all. But this was not the case with the Facebook post. I always got a reply. Not that it helped a lot, but at least better than e-mail or call as others too got to see what my problem was in this case.

The script: Made a script using facebook’s graph API that comments my complaint on flipkart’s posts on their facebook page. On two hundred fifty posts. I was all over their page, every single promotional post of theirs had my complaint on it. Explaining everything in detail. From when I ordered it to how pathetically customer care had handled my complaint. Imagine receiving a complaint from an extremely frustrated customer which is visible to potentially everyone online on facebook, two hundred and fifty times.

The result: Within 12 hours I got three calls from flipkart ( the reverse of what was happening so far). I received the third call as I was unable to attend the first two. Got an immediate apology. Flipkart also admitted they had lost my product during transit and that a fresh order is being placed on fast delivery. They also gave me Rs.100 flipkart wallet money as compensation.

Next day morning I received my phone just before I left for work.

Coding is indeed fun.

Edit: I’ve got many source code requests, so here you go. (I’m not really experienced with either the Graph API or python itself, so please forgive me if you find the code shabby :P)
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import fb #To install this package run: sudo pip install fb
from facepy import GraphAPI #To install this package run: sudo pip install facepy
import time


token=""#Insert access token here.  
facebook=fb.graph.api(token)
graph1 = GraphAPI(token)


vid=102988293558 #This is flipkart page's facebook id
query=str(vid)+"/posts?fields=id&limit=5000000000"
r=graph1.get(query)



idlist=[x['id'] for x in r['data']]
print("There are "+ str(len(idlist)) +" commentable posts.")

char1='y'
count=0
if char1=='y':
    nos=input("Enter number of posts to be commented on: ")
    if nos<=len(idlist):
       for indid in idlist[len(idlist)-(nos):len(idlist)-1]:
    	  count=count+1
          facebook.publish(cat="comments",id=indid,message="Complaint goes here"+str(count))
	  time.sleep(6)
	  
          
          print("Complaint number:"+str(count)+" on www.facebook.com/"+str(indid).split('_')[0]+"/posts/"+str(indid).split('_')[1])
	  
    else: 
          print("Not that many commentable posts available. ")
else :
  print("No complaints made.")
What is the funniest thing you have ever coded?

What is the weirdest place in the world?

Answer by Nitin Gupta:

Socotra

Situated in the Indian Ocean 250 km  from Somalia and 340 km from Yemen, Socotra Island (part  of a group of four islands) was geographically isolated from mainland  Africa for many aeons. The island is about 3,650 square km and has a few  smaller islands around it that are mostly uninhabited. On 2008 it was  recognized as a world natural heritage location.


Source: Google Socotra
What is the weirdest place in the world?

What are some of the most socially impactful Bollywood movies?

Answer by Swagat Siddhartha:

Swades -We the people


One of the best movies in the recent times, I had a teacher who moved back to India after watching this movie.

It is a perfect blend of how Indian culture, the modern day trend of living outside the country and the problems rural India faces.

Some of the scenes are really powerful:

1> A  kid selling water near the railway station:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQVvz8OlY5g

2> Why India is not great:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSNypuXqa1s

3> The night with the poor farmer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wV4S0SnXdKc

4> The electricity generation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1F-6GmhvIE

and finally the song which touched every Indian (specially the ones living in foreign lands)

Yeh Jo Des

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tiVPuLbbHg


Brilliant  plot, direction and acting - One of the most sensible movies ever made!
What are some of the most socially impactful Bollywood movies?

What would happen if USD 1 = INR 1?

Answer by Balaji Viswanathan:


Let us assume that such an event happens overnight without a drastic change in productivity or a massive drop in real wages.

A good Indian engineer makes Rs.75,000 per month. Skills wise, this guy might be comparable to a guy making $3000 in the US.

What if 1 USD becomes 1 INR and this guy’s productivity and salary stays the same? The Indian guy’s salary becomes equal to $75,000. Before he is happy with his paycheck and go on to buy hot gadgets from the Apple store, a few things change.

Why would a company pay him $75,000 when you can get someone for $3000 in the US? Of course they would not. So, every Indian - engineers, teachers, accountants, designers - would be fired from their jobs and jobs would move out of the country as workers are cheaper outside India. Where you cannot move the job outside India (such as cleaning), companies would find tech. An awesome robotic vacuum cleaner worth $1000 would be used rather than the $4000 pm human cleaner. As people get removed from the jobs, plenty of other jobs that rely on them (restaurants, cafes, retail shops, tourism, airlines…) go kaput.

As people get fired, they will be ready to work for lower and lower salaries, until their salary drops below the international level of say $2500. Since 1 USD = 1 INR, that would make great engineers make Rs.2500 pm. How would they pay their EMI (mortgage) on homes, cars and gadgets? They cannot and they would default.

The banks would have huge unpaid loans and they will go bankrupt. Investors would exit and government would have print a lot of money to keep the banks alive. That would spike up the inflation and push down the rupee so much that things get back Rs. 60 = 1 USD. At that point, the Indian’s wage will be so low that jobs will move back again and the cycle would continue.
There are plenty of real life examples of this. In 1986, Japanese yen doubled in strength. $1 was about 280 yens until then and that suddenly become like $1=140 yens. Just that completely screwed Japanese economy, from which they never recovered. Why did Japan increase their currency strength if they knew things are going to get worse? It is because the Americans forced them to do so.

This is the reason why RBI is very careful not to let rupee too strong. It is to India’s advantage that $1 equal Rs.60. It helps keep exports high, wages high and imports low.

Ultimately the strength of a currency depends on only two things:
  1. Productivity of the people. If every guy making Rs.75000 pm is able to produce 25 times more output than a foreigner making $3000, then India can enjoy $1 = Rs.1.
  2. Inflation. If a country goes through a sustained low inflation in relation to other countries, its currency would move up. That means after 100 years, if your salaries stays the same at Rs.75000 pm while America’s inflation takes an average guy there’s salary to $75000, then $1 = Rs. 1
As simple as that. Since, the second scenario is bad, we need to focus only on the first scenario. How do we get an average Indian produce many times more than a foreigner?


EDIT: Based on the comments, I see that people are quite confused by what the currency rates mean. People assume somehow that $1 = 60 Rs means US is stronger than India. By that logic, 1 Bangladeshi Taka that equals 1.5 Yen, means the Bangladeshi economy is stronger than Japan’s?

Currencies had arbitrary starting points. In 1898, the British government fixed 1 rupee equaled 1 shilling and 4 pence (1 pound = 15 rupees). You could have set anything. You could have said 1 rupee equals 10,000 pounds as the starting point and designed the economy that way. It would not have mattered at all. The starting points are merely for convenience.

What matters is, whether the currency is moving up or down over long time.  The rupee has gone down against the pound over the last 115 years and that is an indication that India’s productivity has not kept up and/or the inflation was high relative to UK.

Also read:
  1. Eclectic Economics.
  2. Why has Indian rupee devalued from around Re. 5 per $1 at independence to around Rs 60 per $1 today?
What would happen if USD 1 = INR 1?